Two more 60s love songs

From 1967 (the same year as the Troggs' "Love is all around" love song linked in the earlier post), here's one that reminded me of it; Brenton Woods' "Oogum Boogum Song":


Unfortunately, there is no contemporaneous video to go with it, but the display of the lyrics is better than some of those videos which show a spinning record.

Who got the blues now?

And from a few years earlier (1964), The Reflections in a contemporaneous video of their timeless classic, "Just Like Romeo And Juliet":

I love some of these old 1960s love songs.

Despite the period's reputation, the music doesn't lend itself to easy stereotypes.

MORE: From the ever-knowledgeable Charles G. Hill, an interesting historical comment:

One of the neater facts about the Reflections was that despite being white guys, they recorded for Detroit's Golden World label, owned by Eddie Wingate, who was to Motown's Berry Gordy what Chrysler was to GM: a crosstown rival and an occasional pain, if never a serious threat for market share. Edwin Starr started at Wingate's Ric-Tic label, waxing tracks which turned out to have included Gordy's own Funk Brothers. Gordy, peeved, eventually bought out Wingate and, tellingly, put Starr, not on Motown or Tamla, but on the Gordy label.

UPDATE: Speaking of Romeo and Juliet in a 60s retro context, Zombietime features pictures of "a pro-America Romeo, and an anti-America Juliet."

They seem like a perfect match -- but alas, 'tis not to be! Politics has quashed this potential romance before it even had a chance to start.

For love's sake: Can't we all just get along?

(Via Glenn Reynolds.)

Only if Romeo and Juliet teach their parents well....

posted by Eric on 06.22.08 at 10:21 PM










Comments

One of the neater facts about the Reflections was that despite being white guys, they recorded for Detroit's Golden World label, owned by Eddie Wingate, who was to Motown's Berry Gordy what Chrysler was to GM: a crosstown rival and an occasional pain, if never a serious threat for market share. Edwin Starr started at Wingate's Ric-Tic label, waxing tracks which turned out to have included Gordy's own Funk Brothers. Gordy, peeved, eventually bought out Wingate and, tellingly, put Starr, not on Motown or Tamla, but on the Gordy label.

CGHill   ·  June 22, 2008 11:34 PM

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