If you can like, why can't you dislike?

A Facebook "dislike" button is being called the most wanted product in 2011:

Recently Facebook added "Questions" to their impressive list of features for the popular social networking website, today we thought we would look at other features which could be added, it seems to us as though a dislike button is what people really want.

Over 3 million people have "Liked" the "Dislike Button" Facebook page, you can show your support for the new feature by liking this page, also you can read what people have to say on the matter in the page's discussions section.

I like dislike, but I suspect Facebook dislikes dislike.

Not to sound negative, but I dislike their disliking of dislike.

All considerations of adolescent snittiness aside, there is a practical reason for a dislike button. Lots of times, I have been horrified by things enough to have wanted to share my horror on Facebook. But there's something about clicking "Like" on a link to a story about a Swat Team brutalizing an innocent family and shooting their dog that rubs me the wrong way. "Share" or "Recommend" are OK, but seeing only "Like" as an option sucks. 

Dislike would be great, so I like this button.

 

facebook-dislike.jpg

Just don't expect me to install one here!

posted by Eric on 04.30.11 at 01:40 PM










Comments

I'd click the "Like" button for this post, but heck, you don't even have one of those!

I totally agree with you. Stories similar to the one you cite about the SWAT team activity require a "Dislike" button.

joated   ·  April 30, 2011 3:35 PM

... To dislike, disapprove, or discriminate, are no longer allowed. Somehow, someway, it became a right to not face criticism or judgement by others. It is no longer enough to be free to pursue individual happiness, others must not publicly disrespect you in your pursuit. Everyone is now special. So of course the internet must be tamed. Wars of beliefs and ideas must be made to follow civilized rules of engagement.

As each new generation performs the same social, government, and economic experiments, death can look more and more like a perk to the aged.

Will   ·  April 30, 2011 4:12 PM

Heh. 3,229,452 at present, and I turned that 1 on the end to a 2...despite the fact that I really don't like facebook itself, but had to get an account for work. Yeah. You convinced me log into facebook for something other than being able to access client images (that they upload to their walls, and that can't-since facebook's latest "gallery" enhancement-be easily viewed in full size by those un-logged-in antisocial peons like me.)

Me, I LIKE the ability to dislike.

And, what Will said. "As each new generation performs the same social, government, and economic experiments, death can look more and more like a perk to the aged."

Although I would have added (unsuccessfully) after performs.

Oh, and it's unlikely you'd get many dislikes from me. :-P (Except, perhaps, one, for conning me into logging into facebook).

Kathy Kinsley   ·  April 30, 2011 8:03 PM

Great concept, but I think we've already lost the culture war if the champions of culture are using "s--k" in public discource. I'm not talking about what you say in private when you drop a hammer on your toe. In my forties now (but hardly a senior citizen) I can recall when crass language was considered bad taste in print, outside of novels. Though not an "f" bomb, it refers to fellatio and/or "s--ks s--t." I hope if we're turning back the clock we can go further than the 90s! Just a thought. (Sorry for the gratuitous bleeping but I didn't want to seem hypocritcal.)

Matt   ·  May 1, 2011 12:07 PM

As a champion of culture, I admittedly suck. Especially where it cums to championing sucky-ass culture.

:)

Eric Scheie   ·  May 1, 2011 12:34 PM

Eric, hon, I think that comment corrupted morals I wasn't aware of having. :)

I'm proud to know you, sir.

Sarah   ·  May 1, 2011 11:00 PM

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